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Baysunghuri Qur’an, the Biggest Handwritten Qur’an

Baysunghuri Qur’an, the Biggest Handwritten Qur’an
 27 December 2016  |  1387 Visit

Baysunghuri Qur’an, the Biggest Handwritten Qur’an

In the eighth century of Hijrah, Teimur and his family settled in Herat and Samarqand where they favored artists and founded various art workshops.

In the eighth century of Hijrah, Teimur and his family settled in Herat and Samarqand where they favored artists and founded various art workshops.
Teimurid rulers showed special interest in painting and calligraphy and such an interest resulted in permanency of Shiraz style, evolution of Nastaliq script, and generation of Herat school.
The age of Muslim convert Mongols of Ilkhanate dynasty was a period when scribing of magnificence works and large holy books became customary as an indicator of the power and magnificence of their sovereignty.
Production of large Qur’an manuscripts especially in Thulth, Muhaqqaq and Reihan scripts that for their graphic potentials in macrography and height of letters caused the big seize of manuscript, as well as the large and magnificent Tazhib work, occurred in Seleucid period. The exquisite Baysunghuri holy book is an exceptional and singular work of this age.
In the complex of library and museums of Astan Quds Razavi there are preserved 65 sheets of this Qur’an containing verses from 53 surahs of the holy Qur’an, that according to order of verses and surahs, starts with the first verse of surah “Ra’d” in chapter 13 and end with surah “Adiyat” in chapter 30.
Including the number of words and lines of each page and with respect to the space occupied by heads of surahs and considering the acknowledgement or endowment letter pages, the book is estimated to have about 823 to 856 pages; however, there is no sheets remaining from about 97 initiate sheets and some nine ending sheets.
All the remaining sheets of the manuscript were transferred to the library of Astan Quds Razavi by Imamzadeh (offspring of an Imam) Ibrahim in 1301 H.Sh./1922. In this year commander Hussein Aqakhan Khazaei, commander of eastern Khorasan army at the time of Reza Shah as commander in chief, found 52 broken and impaired sheets of the holy book in a box in Imamzadeh mausoleum and after informing the commander in chief about that, he was allowed to give it to the library of Astan Quds Razavi for amendment.
The already known sheets of this exquisite Qur’an include two pieces in the Reza Abbasi Museum, two complete sheets in Kakh-e Golestan Library, one sheet in Iran National Museum, 12 sheets in the Metropolitan Museum, one sheet in the Sudawar (Hioston) Complex, one sheet in Naser Khalili Complex, a few pieces in private complexes of Geneva in Italy, and one piece in Ahan Gallery in London.

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